Planning Consents

Over the years we have had considerable success acquiring planning consents and listed building consents on our clients behalf. This includes both indoor and outdoor attached to, or within the grounds of, listed buildings. This is not an uncommon scenario and can prove challenging, but Pool Architecture has a wealth of practical knowledge in this area, assuring confidence in our abilities to achieve the desired outcome.

Swimming pool planning and listed building consents

Please take a look at a few of our case studies. These showcase some of our more challenging yet successful applications to date:

Cockfield Hall, Yoxford, Suffolk

Objective

Cockfield Hall is a Grade 1 Listed Building and the client sought to construct an indoor pool within the residential curtilage of this Grade 1 Listed Building.

Philosophy

The design process was conceived to ensure restrictions, defined by English Heritage, were met and an appropriate solution achieved. This required not only planning and listed building consent but also careful consultation with English Heritage to ensure their support could be gained to ensure a successful application.

The approach was therefore to ensure from an early stage that the client was aware of the complexity of the application and was amenable to a degree of flexibility within the initial design which, during the consultation period with all of the consultees would inevitably change. The attached successful planning and listed building consents were the net result of some 12 months of meticulous negotiation with all of the consultees.

Process Pool Architecture

Consent document and plan drawing

Foxcote House, Gloucestershire

Objective

Foxcote House is a Grade II Listed Building with a curtilage barn structure in close proximity to the listed building. The client wished to convert the barn to provide an indoor pool with gymnasium and some accommodation.

Philosophy

To advise the client at an early stage that there was no guarantee of success and keep an open mind as to the degree to which the existing structure could be altered. Careful design and inventive use of space ensured not only the maximum swimming length within the structure but also the minimum amount of space within the valuable envelope of the building was used for plant and equipment.

Negotiations with the Local Authority were predicated on previous precedence of similar structures and endorsed the appropriateness of this type of building with the proposed use of a leisure facility adjacent to a listed structure. Limited alteration of the fenestration ensured the conservation officers support was gained and the successful application provided a substantial amount of planning gain for the estate as a whole.

Process Pool Architecture

Consent document and plan drawing

Hound House, Surrey

Objective

To build a swimming pool inside a listed barn, within the grounds of a listed structure.

Philosophy

Having gained several consents for similar structures in the past our advice to the client from the outset was that there was a substantial chance of success and therefore the initial design should not be compromised.

An aggressive approach was taken with the Local Authority; which included listening carefully to their concerns and responding with revisions at every turn. This left only one outstanding objection, which was that in principle a barn with this heritage pedigree should not be used for an indoor pool, drawing on our library of previous consents from other Local Authorities. This objection was inevitably overcome and a successful planning and listed building application approval granted.

Process Pool Architecture

Consent document and plan drawing

Farncombe House, Somerset

Objective

To to build an indoor pool as an extension to a Grade II listed farmhouse in Somerset.

Philosophy

Early advice to the client indicated that there was the possibility of a successful application if a degree of flexibility was provided to the overall external and elevation treatment to ensure that any concerns that the conservation officer may have could be accommodated. Multiple revisions to both the design and layout were required before successful planning and listed building approvals were granted, these approvals made for a substantial extension to the existing property.

Process Pool Architecture

Consent document and plan drawing

Permitted Development Rights

Overview

Permitted Development Rights are an area of increasing complexity. In summary they are the rights that most households enjoy and grant the ability to build within their residential curtilage without the need for full planning consent. Notwithstanding this in some instances clients elect to apply for a Certificate of Lawful Development to ensure that when they subsequently come to pass on the property to their successors in title all of the paperwork is in order.

The curious facet of this bit of legislation is that a lot of Local Authority Planning Officers don’t fully understand or interpret the legislation correctly. This is of course entirely understandable because the legislation has been amended since the original 1995 General Permitted Development Order and the attached letter gives a flavour of what can happen. It is always worth looking at this bit of legislation when consider an outdoor or smaller scale indoor pool. It should be said that this section of legislation does not apply fully to Listed Buildings, buildings within conservation areas or areas in outstanding natural beauty.

Process Pool Architecture

Permitted Development Rights Document

Manor House, Kettering

Objective

To gain Planning and Listed Building Consent for a substantial structure covering an existing pool within the residential curtilage of a Listed Manor House within the conservation area in village of Burton Latimer.

Philosophy

Provide a variety of designs to the client to enable early discussion on the most suitable structure for the site in parallel with assessing its likely chances of approval. Appoint suitably qualified historic conservation consultant to undertake a detailed analysis on the history of the site and ensure that joint heritage and design and access statement unfold in parallel with the design of the proposed indoor pool.

Process Pool Architecture

Planning consent document

Process Pool Architecture

Plan drawing

Birch House, Ampney Crucis

Objective

To gain Planning and Listed Building Consent for an outdoor swimming pool within the residential curtilage of a Grade II listed building complete with Grade II listed stable buildings. The conservation area split the site but the site for the pool was within the conservation area.

Philosophy

Research carefully the planning history of the site to establish the nature of any potential objections. Engage in early conversation with the specialist conservation officer who will be responsible for administering the application. Listen carefully to their concerns and arrange for an early meeting to establish their preferences. Reflect back those preferences in a series of drawings to ensure the final application, when submitted to Committee, goes with the full blessing of both the conservation officer and the professional planning officer.

Process Pool Architecture

Planning consent document

Process Pool Architecture

Plan drawing

Orchard House, Gloucestershire

Objective

To get consent for a large outdoor swimming pool in an area of land previously agricultural. The Local Authority had identified that the site was outside of the residential curtilage and the objective of the application was to get not only consent for the pool but also change of use from agricultural to residential.

Philosophy

Reviewing the documents in situ at the Local Authority offices provided an opportunity to establish early on that the client had acquired the site within the last 10 years and records existed within the Local Authority office to show applications for the house within the residential curtilage in that key period. It was therefore inevitable that any application would have to take on board that this was a formal application to establish the change of use from agricultural to residential.

The appointment of a planning consultant was essential to the application to ensure that the letter of support made the appropriate arguments, justifying the proposed changes. The information provided by the duty officer at the Local Authority with regard to the extent of the conservation area was initially wrong and source documents had to be obtained to establish the boundary, which influenced the application significantly. The successful decision notice is attached.

Process Pool Architecture

Planning consent document

Process Pool Architecture

Plan drawing

Shudy Camps Park

Objective

To gain planning consent for a 25 metre indoor pool within the residential curtilage of a grade two listed building.

Philosophy

Having listened carefully to the client’s brief, we concluded that the potential mass of such a large building would require something of architectural excellence to pass scrutiny with the planners. It also became clear having visited the site that the location of the new indoor pool would need to be close enough to the listed asset to make it easy to access and yet if it were too close the conservation officer might suggest it had a negative impact. Two contender sites within the residential curtilage were appraised. This enabled the brief to be explored fully before settling on the final location. A detailed design and heritage statement was commissioned to enable the statement of significance and heritage to inform the design process. This in effect provided a dry run for the planning application. The design was refined so that the previous footprint at ground level was not used for Plant Room equipment and changing rooms; this was all delegated to a basement. Consent was granted on 18th Nov 2020.

Process Pool Architecture

Planning consent document

Process Pool Architecture

Plan drawings

Park View

Objective

To gain planning consent for a domestic indoor pool within the residential curtilage of a new dwelling sitting within the newly defined South Downs National Park.

Philosophy

Planning policy within the National Park is emerging and stricter than normal policies. The client brief which included pool, spa, changing area and relaxation space was always going to challenge these policies. To ensure a successful scheme a forensic analysis of the South Downs National Park emerging local plan and the planning policies SD 31 which requires design work to a high standard, needed to be defined and clearly understood at the outset.

A forensic planning consultant was employed to provide a report on the current planning policy landscape. This informed the design and set clear limits on the potential footprint of any development. Understanding that the critical proposed floor space limit of 30% of the existing dwelling and the requirement to respect the established character of the area enabled the design to maximise the potential of the site.

Consent was granted on 5th of June 2019.

Process Pool Architecture

Planning consent document

Process Pool Architecture

Plan drawing

“We are thrilled with the pool and both Jane and I have very much valued your help in the designing phase and guiding us through the contract. The boys (and us) have had a great time using it this summer (and we even had some good weather in which to enjoy it!). Many thanks.”

Andrew and Jane Fenwick – Gloucestershire | Summer 2011

Planning Consents Pool Architecture
Planning Consents Pool Architecture
Process Pool Architecture Planning Consents